Why You Should Sign Up For Project Mynt’s Music Production Capsule

 

Yes, it sounds like it would be really cool to be a music producer but, we assure you, there’s so much more to this new-age career than meets the eye. Given that Project Mynt is committed to encouraging Gen-Z to explore and, hopefully, pursue unconventional jobs, the first thing we need to do is to generate awareness about the mindset and the workflow of a music producer. Contrary to popular opinion, it’s not an assembly line-like process, and neither is it easy. 

Moreover, we believe that the typical entrant or aspirant to this industry suffers from a lack of understanding, not only with regards to protocol, but also the definition of the role of a music producer. 

Given that there’s actually a very large chunk in the demographic at the level of the uninformed and uncounselled aspirant who is seeking out information to cement their inclination towards music production, we saw the need for this course. Every producer worth their salt will vouch for it; there’s a shocking lack of resources available to absolute beginners, and veterans say that it would have been beneficial to have had the opportunity to enroll for a course like this in the nascent stages of their own careers.

Though it’s designed as a very brief introduction, our carefully-curated curriculum definitely serves as a gateway to an informed critical first step.

What’s in the curriculum? 

Structured over six weeks, the curriculum for the EMP capsule course aims to present the requirement(s), need and path of a music producer and works towards setting expectations in terms of what one needs to do to begin to develop the mindset this journey requires. 

Our approach involves outlining the tools that are currently available, and what these can become in the hands of an able producer. We want our students to define and challenge their limits, and begin the process of identifying and creating a personality that will influence the way they look at music-making. Forever. musi

If you think that Electronic Music Production could be your next thing, head to www.projectmynt.com for more details.

Student Speak – What the first batch of Project Mynt’s music production capsule have to say

The entire song production process over six fulfilling weeks – our Music Production capsule has been curated to show students how to leverage existing tools and technology to make music. The curriculum is an overview of the key aspects of the production process, starting from the fundamentals of sound and music theory to the core processes applied within digital audio workstations. Having completed the first round of capsules, we decided to stop telling you why you should sign up for our immersive courses. Instead, we asked our students what they thought of this one-of-a-kind education experience. Here’s a gist of what they had to say:

Udit Godyal, student – Music Production capsule 

“It (the course) was really amazing since I was able to get answers to all my questions and know exactly what I wanted to learn. For me, that was a desire to understand how the music industry works and how to get into the scene. The faculty was really good and made everything easily digestible with their fun, interactive method of teaching.” 

Naman Keshri, student – Music Production capsule 

“The six-day experience was like a sneak peak into the next phase of my life. If the field of music is full of grand and beautiful trees, Gaurav Chintamani sir gave me the seeds of those trees. I am planting what I learnt every day since I completed the capsule course so I can keep growing with music and also make it sound mine. Sir is a universe of information and one of the greatest musicians I’ve ever met, his words gave me chills – they have so much weight and worth! He used the simplest things which together sounded so complex. 

In fact, the most surprising thing about my experience was learning about the music-making process. Seeing how synthesisers work, mixing, music theory, gathering sounds from your surroundings atmosphere and making music out of it – by the time Gaurav sir mixed a song made by my friend, I discovered a “oneness” where all the elements have their own significance but together they make music. The capsule course connected music to the deepest level, by tapping into my state of mind. 

Electronic Music Production is definitely my next thing. Being a songwriter and the vocalist of a band, I found that it is the way to make my music bigger and to bring out my feelings and ideas together in the greatest possible form.”

Garv Grover, student – EMP capsule 

“As someone who’s been producing music for about two-three years now, there were definitely some gaps in my own understanding that I needed to fill with professional guidance and mentoring. Over the duration of the course, not only did I learn a great deal about music production but also about the kind of personality and approach a music producer should have.  

One of the most special experiences was watching my own composition evolve to a whole other level when Gaurav sir mixed it to demonstrate the essentials of mixing music. I  believe that was the best way to conclude the entire Music Production programme. 

The course also showed me that Mr. Gaurav Chintamani is the mentor I always needed yet never had. After the very first session, I felt as though the huge roadblocks in my understanding of music were all being cleared. It’s been more than a month since the last session but I still find myself thinking “What would Gaurav sir do if he were in my place?” when I encounter a problem.  

Simply put, it’s been a hell of a ride.”

To find out if music production is your next thing, join us for our EMP capsule starting on the 24th of August at Sri Aurobindo Centre for Arts and Communication. 

Know Your Mentor : Gaurav Chintamani | Electronic Music Production

Want to know the man behind the music production capsule course at Project Mynt? SAE alumni, Gaurav Chintamani is the Course Director of the Audio Engineering and Music Production Programme at the Sri Aurobindo Centre for Arts and Communication (SACAC). Gaurav is also a professional musician and music producer who has been working in the industry for close to two decades.

Gaurav Chintamani owns Quarter Note Studios, one of the most reputed recording studios and music production houses in New Delhi, and has produced content for a variety of projects from radio and TV broadcast, independent documentaries, short films, ad-films, theatre productions and feature films. Gaurav is also a member of Advaita, one of India’s best-known music ensembles.

The most crucial skill for a music producer is…

To know the difference between taste and bias, and develop the ability to listen without the latter and take decisions based on the former.

The best piece of advice you have ever gotten

“Don’t mistake sloppiness for feel” and “If you don’t like it, how will you make other people like it?”

The biggest roadblock you encountered during your professional career, and how you overcame it      

I face the same insecurity as every other creative person where I wonder is this/am I good enough? The only way to overcome it is to practice! 

A good producer is…

Someone who can find emotion in a musical statement and squeeze out the mileage, while being completely invisible. Remember, people need to hear the song, not the production.

A mentor that dramatically changed your perspective on music and music production

Not really but I am fascinated by artists, and Van Gogh is my absolute favourite. I think I’ve figured out more about music production by looking at paintings than sitting in front of a computer screen. 

A word to the incoming batch of your music production capsule

Paraphrasing a Japanese proverb, “Don’t be afraid of moving slowly, be afraid of standing still.”

Learn how to produce your own music with Gaurav Chintamani at Project Mynt’s Music Production Capsule this August. Click here to know more

 

Three Kinds Of Collaborations Every Musician Should Try Out

Want to have more people listen to your music? Collaboration is key! 

Being a good musician isn’t the only thing that you need to exist in the market today; times have changed and, as a community, we’re growing by the thousands.  

Gone are the days when people lined up outside stores to purchase their first record. I can literally discover ten new artists in the next 45 minutes on my phone. Sound Cloud, iTunes or YouTube, these three platforms pretty much sum up the presence of a musician today. But what if you’re just starting out? What if you’re somebody who wants to go from a listening base of a few thousand to a few million?

Collaboration

Cross-connecting audiences through platforms, musicians, and genres is the new normal in the world of music, and it has been for the last few decades. Collaborations are the creative passage. Remember that time when Aerosmith and Run-D.M.C came together to create one of the most iconic collaborations of all time? 

The point is that collaborations are cool, creative, and quite the catch. 

So for every hustling artist, here are a few ways you can use them to help grow your fan base: 

A live collaboration

This one’s obvious. Performing with another artist who complements or even contrasts with your music makes people go crazy. Re-look at the collaborations I’ve mentioned above. Aerosmith and Run DMC broke barriers between rock and rap with their collaboration. It’s the ultimate platform that lets you bring two breeds of crowds together. So try and do this for your next performance!

The other way of doing this is literally going live on your social handles with each other. The greater benefit of doing this is that you end up avoiding the logistics and effort, and get to concentrate more on your music than selling tickets. Other than this, you can even hijack their social media for a day and plan new content for their audiences while they do the same for you. It’s fun, refreshing, and helps you engage with more and more people. 

A YouTube collaboration

Got a track that you’re planning to produce a video for? Get a few cameos or maybe even indie actors in there. People love productions like this where their favourite artists come together from different backgrounds. Such diversity helps you reach out to larger groups of audiences. 

Featured collaborations 

These go waaaay back—remember While My Guitar Gently Weeps?

It doesn’t take away from your work, your track. It doesn’t put pressure on the invited artist to curate something from scratch. It gives you the benefit of understanding their audiences as well. But my advice is to not depend on them for promotions since it’s your baby and not theirs. So go for this lighter option when you have a track in mind that you feel may be a fit for a fellow musician. 

Having been a part of all three collaborations, I truly believe they’re worth exploring. While you get to reach out to newer ears you also get the opportunity to investigate your own creative depths and learn a lot of new things. 

Already tried these collaborations out? Tell us about your experience in the comments below!  Also, if you dream of becoming a  music producer and work on collaborations with your favourite artists’; we at Mynt are offering a electronic music production capsule course at a state-of-the-art studio facility. To know more click here.

Five tips for singer-songwriters struggling to find the perfect words!

Inspiration is a funny thing; it can come from routine chores, life-changing events, the feeling of being in love, or even a shower. There’s no set path to inspiration; some artists wait years for it, while others are lucky enough to build a momentum through everyday realizations. Songwriting can, at times, be daunting. 

As an artist, what I have found is that, while inspiration has been triggered by the best and worst of times, the lack of it is incredibly (and universally) frustrating. Especially if you have a song in your heart that’s just waiting to be written and the songwriting bit is tough. In the attempt of powering through this block, here are a few things can help if inspiration is playing hide-and-seek with you:  

Start somewhere

If you’re not satisfied with the quality of your lyrics (you feel they’re too bland or aren’t articulated the way you’d like) don’t obsess over them. Instead, shift your focus to the tune or melody that (I believe) has the power to elevate lyrics. It’s always better to draft a verse or a chorus and then build a couple of chords to see how it comes along. Once you have a composition going, maybe you can come back to the lyrics and see how to tweak them. 

Change your relationship with procrastination

We’re creatives. Procrastination is in our genes. No but seriously, the tendency to delay the process isn’t really you delaying the process. Your subconscious can be a cruel angel. While your consciousness is riddled with guilt, magic maybe happening in the background. The greatest epiphanies (or the simplest revelations) are made possible when your mind is freed up. Try to focus on things that have nothing to do with songwriting so your mind can get to work. Go for a jog, start painting, or even do a little bit of gardening, and allow your mind engage in a creative dialogue with itself. 

Get a groove goin’

Every song has a vibe that is defined by its pulse or a groove. Get to your DAW, churn out a rhythm with an instrument that resonates with you and see what happens next. The groove might just inspire the words that you’re looking for. 

Maybe it’s the melody

Every song has a hook—a verse, rhythm or maybe a melody—that sticks with you and your listeners. It’s that one sweet sound which becomes the identity of the track, the thing that people use to remind each other of it. Once you’ve started putting it together, try using it to elevate the lyrics. This really helped me. 

Intros can get you to the end

When music and words burn together, there’s pure, heartfelt warmth. In fact, I’d go so far as to say that I can’t think of a better feeling. And this feeling has a starting point; it can be a word, hymn, or even just a single instrument. Getting the premise right is crucial to developing it further so that it captures and conveys the emotion that the song is about. 

So, make sure you start fearlessly and make it end tremendously. 

Want to learn more about music production and the key elements of it? Join our music production course today! 

Got a hook of your own? Share it with us in the comments below!

Keke, do you still love me?

“In My Feelings” by Drake was a worldwide hit. Chances are you haven’t heard the name Benjamin Workman before, but does TrapMoneyBenny sound familiar? Yep, the same TrapMoneyBenny from the first few lines of the quintessential summer anthem ‘In My Feelings’ by Drake. TrapMoneyBenny a.k.a. Benjamin Workman is a music producer who has worked on some amazing tracks over the last decade, but who only came into the spotlight last year with “In my feelings”.

Patience and perseverance–these are two virtues that TrapMoneyBenny, and most other music producers, know only too well. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, Benny started making music as a hobby in high school, teaching himself how to produce along with a few of his singer and rapper friends. After graduating high school, the aspiring producer moved to Los Angeles to pursue a full-time career in music. He signed up with the singer-songwriter collective, 1500 or Nothin’ and honed his production chops for five long years. Then in 2013, a member from Drake’s production team reached out to him to solicit some beats. He sent some material he had been working on, and felt like the big time was coming. However, despite that promising connection, nothing happened with Drake and TrapMoneyBenny continued producing music, for artists like Key! and Chief Keef. 

In the summer of 2018, Benny decided to follow-up with Drake’s production team on a whim. He wrote them an email which they replied to (much to Benny’s surprise) asking for some beats. Next, they sent a specific request for the stems of one particular beat, sending him back to work. “In My Feelings” was released as the fifth single from Drake’s fifth studio album, “Scorpion” in July of the same year, and it broke the record for most streams in a single week with a whopping 116.2 million plays. The big time had officially arrived for TrapMoneyBenny, but it was after a long and arduous struggle that had spanned over ten years.   

The moral here is two-fold. Firstly, never get discouraged by rejection and don’t let it burn bridges. In 2013, Benny could have easily severed ties with the production team when they didn’t get back to him (we know how sensitive creatives are). Instead he kept pushing and, five years later, he hit the jackpot. The second, and perhaps most important, lesson is that when you have nothing to lose, always go for it. The worst outcome in Benny’s situation was another unanswered email, but the best outcome is the timeline we’re currently sitting on. If someone has set you down, don’t spam them with emails but remember that (sometimes) a hopeful shot in the dark can be the luckiest. 

Want to write the next ‘In My Feelings’? Check out our Music Production capsule at https://projectmynt.com/course-music-production

Think you need a fancy studio for music production? Think again!

With so much emphasis on music production value these days, people think that an expensive studio and lots of equipment is the key to making a great record. So, you’ll be surprised to learn that the man responsible for Kendirck Lamar’s music production did it all on a phone.  Kendrick’s music producer, Steve Lacy needed to make the beat for hit single ‘Pride’ (Damn, 2017) was an iPhone and a gadget called the iRig. 

When his request for a MacBook was denied every Christmas, for four years straight,  Lacy finally gave up and started exploring beat-making apps on his old iPod Touch. When he discovered apps such as GarageBand, iMPC and BeatMaker 2, he realised that the process of making music on the phone was actually rather nifty and convenient. Without having to worry too much about the final sounds, he could capture the essence of the idea and get into the groove of things. A guitarist, he wanted to ideate by recording guitar lines and soon got himself an iRig, a small, cheap device that lets you record audio into your Apple device using the iPhone’s lightning connector. In a recent interview, Lacy revealed that he loved to make music wherever he went, like in the car while driving (not recommended and very dangerous!), so the iRig gives him great flexibility. 

But Lacy also does this to prove a point to an industry that’s increasingly obsessed with gear and production. He wants people to start focussing on the music and the performance more than the gear that was used to record it (I’ve been guilty of this in the past but have since realised that a great song is a great song, no matter how its produced).  

The most important thing is the music. Does it move you? Does it move others? Sure, in an ideal world, we would all love to have unlimited access to Abbey Road Studios and the opportunity to spend months working on our albums there. But look at the silver lining–technology means that you can start working on an idea the minute you have it! You can capture the essence of your song, the very thing that makes it special, in the moment and freeze it so that it will always be special. 

That being said, once the initial song has been put down on a portable device, it is best to finish it off using a computer with proper gear. Music production skills are a must-have in a world where musicians have to be their own recording engineers, producers and marketers. Without adequate production know-how, it’s almost impossible to survive in the business. 

Steve Lacy’s inspiring story has a lot of takeaways, but the most relevant for me were:  ;  

  • BE READY : Inspiration can strike anywhere; in the shower, while walking, driving or simply going about life. We need to be ready to capture it and, for that, you should familiarise yourself with music making apps such as GarageBand to make sure a great idea is not forgotten (it’s very irritating, trust me).
  • BE OPEN : Keep yourself open to new ideas and don’t disregard something just because its simple. More often than not, the simplest way is the most effective. 
  • KEEP WRITING : Write every day, even when you’re not inspired so that when inspiration does strike, you know where to take it. 
  • STAY RELEVANT : With technology advancing so quickly, learn about all that is new and don’t ignore where the world is going. It’s easy to get comfortable with what you know, but if you don’t know what’s current, you’re going to be left behind in an industry that changes too quickly. 

Learn how to produce your own music on anything from an app to industry-standard software by signing up for our EMP capsule at www.projectmynt.com where we provide experiential learning that’s taught by professionals. 

Did you download GarageBand or any of these music making apps and start tinkering about? I hope this inspired you to write music and if it did, I’d love to hear your thoughts and your music. Mail me at srijan@projectmynt.com and I shall write back to you as soon as possible!

Five Things I Wish I Knew When I Started Producing Music

“The devil’s in the details, and little things matter the most.” I produced my first original track when I was a teenager, and I wish someone had told me this! I started learning how to produce music independently, learning everything I could, from what I had. And, while I certainly believe that hands-on experience is one of the best teachers out there, I now know the value of practical advice and mentorship from those who’ve already been there, done that. It saves time.  If you’re in the same place that I was almost a decade ago, here’s what I believe are helpful tips and suggestions to guide you through the process of recording your first ever song. While there’s no norm to making music—given the digital boom, musicians can be as audacious and as experimental as they like—it’s always helpful to have a solid foundation. These music production tips will help you build exactly that; read on! 

Develop the song’s identity

Just as verses make up the lyrics of the song, loops in the music become the signature tone or the identity of the track. This means that the repetition of that loop is important, but minimalism is just as crucial. Attain equilibrium. It’s easy to get swayed by a sweet, sweet tone but you must remember not to take away from other elements of the music and, by extension, destroying the memorability of the song. 

Songwriting

With regard to vocables, I believe that they can be used minimally and still convey powerful emotions so long as the fixed attributes are solid. These are the melody, rhythm, and the harmony that’s backed by a clean yet potent start, middle and end. 

Don’t be Sir Mix-a-lot

Mixing—the most exciting stage of music production for some needs a word of caution, here. Don’t get carried away. Often, this excitement makes even the best artists focus too much on using all the instruments to develop the sound they’ve been dying for. While that’s certainly important, there’s a few other things to watch out for, like ensuring clean audibility of each instrument and maintaining the frequency of sound in prerecorded gaps.  

Edit your editing 

Don’t depend on digital editing; tools like modulation are not necessities. Instead, think of them as options to inspire creativity, should you need to use them. Here are a few rules I follow: Don’t edit while you record or write. Don’t overdo it—if something sounds goods, let it remain untouched. Don’t chop recklessly so that editing, which was supposed to make everything come together, has left your song drained of vitality, a mere tune with no life. 

However, my most important tip is this: trust your gut and keep at it. Making music is part technical prowess and part intuition; don’t let a quest for the former overpower the latter. If you’re not happy with the way your song sounds, record it again. And again, if you need to. Trust yourself to know where you need to go all out, and where you should be holding back. If you get stuck in the middle, start again. Do this till you’re happy with it; you’ll know when you are.  

Got any other music production tips that have helped you so far? Share them with us in the comments below! 

Everything you need to know about a career in Sports Management

A career in sport is no longer limited to playing; the industry is interdisciplinary and has segments like sport media, team administration, sports medicine, and sports management—perfect for those who have an administrative bent of mind and good managerial skills.

This is the business and applications side, or the driving force, of the sports industry. Sports managers call the shots and work tirelessly with colleges, universities, clubs, recreational departments and sports marketing firms, behind-the-scenes, to handle retailing, branding, merchandising, financing and marketing. They can be sports administrators, event managers, facility managers, sports economists or information experts.

 

Starting out

It’s not necessary to be an athlete or sportsperson to build a successful career in sports management. If you are passionate about sports and have a large knowledge base, that’s a good starting point.

This role requires a combination of multiple skills like planning, directing, controlling, organizing, budgeting, leading and evaluating a sports event.

If you’re thinking about pursuing a career in this field, opting for commerce stream in high school is advised; subjects like Business Studies, Economics and Accounts help build a strong foundation for further study.

Speaking of which, here are the colleges in India that offer courses in Sports Management:

  • National Academy of Sports Management, Mumbai – BBA in Sports Management
  • George College, Kolkata, West Bengal – BA in Sports Management
  • Maulana Abdul Kalam Azad University of Technology, West Bengal – BA in Sports Management
  • International Institute of Sports Management (IISM), Mumbai – BA in Sports Management

 

These courses cover subjects like sports management theory, sports marketing, fundraising, promotions, public relations, ethics in sports management, legal aspects of the sport, facility planning and management and risk management.

The Scope of Sports Management

It’s a good time to be thinking about a career in this field; globally, the sports sector is estimated to be worth $460-620 billion.With the advent of sports leagues, like the Indian Premier League, Hockey Premier League, Pro Kabaddi, Indian Super League, the sports industry in India is flourishing. And the market is only set to grow from here on—courtesy a growing economy and a huge passion for sport.Consequently, the need for trained, skilled and passionate sports managers is also only going to increase.

Also read: Interesting Career Opportunities in Photography

Five Recording Studios in Delhi that are perfect for Amateurs

It can be pretty intimidating to take the plunge and record your first song but the right studio can make all the difference. With testimonials from Project MyNT co-founder and the drummer of Parikrama, Srijan Mahajan, we’ve put together a list of the five best music recording studios in Delhi to record your first song at. Marked by solid infrastructure, the support of gifted producers and good vibes only, these spaces are amateur-friendly so that all you need to carry with yourself is your song and a little bit of faith.

 

Quarter Note Studios

Located in a quiet residential colony in South Delhi, Quarter Note has an amazing sounding room, a great collection of mics, and fantastic coffee. Some of India’s best indie musicians have recorded their music at this legendary studio that has been around since the early 2000s, and the space certainly feels special. If you’re looking for a space that will inspire creativity, and a hit song, this is the place to check out.

Testimonial: “I have recorded two full albums here, and had the best time with Gaurav Chintamani,the owner. Brutally honest, he’s always given me constructive criticism and pushed me to deliver better sounding takes that, despite being jarring to some, worked very well for me. The veteran producer runs Sri Aurobindo Centre for Arts and Communication’s audio program, and is also a facilitator of the Electronic Music Production capsule at Project MyNT.”

Where: Basement, A-196, Shivalik Colony, Malviya Nagar, New Delhi, 110017

Connect with Quarter Note Studios here.

 

Ferris Wheel Studios

Gurgaon’s Ferris Wheel Studios is the perfect place to collaborate; you can connect with industry professionals–from songwriters to vocalists and producers–at this studio, if you need a little extra help. Although it’s a little out of the way, Ferris Wheel’s amazing rooms and infrastructure make it worth the trek (if you’re based in New Delhi). This is the go-to studio for most independent artists in the capital, at the moment.

Testimonial: “Having recorded a bunch of times here, I can safely say this is one of the most professional studios in Delhi NCR. Equipped with painstakingly-designed and meticulously-executed live and control rooms, multiple segregated spaces and some great gear, it is a world class studio.”

Where: 59/60, 2nd Floor, Old Judicial Complex, Sector-15/Civil Lines, Gurugram, Haryana 122001

Connect with Ferris Wheel Studios on Facebook, Instagram or their website.

 

Ghar ka Studios

The site where more than twenty albums have been produced, Ghar Ka Studios is run by seasoned independent musicians, Ritwik De and Amar Pandey. Facilities include high quality recordings, multi tracking, and three treated rooms for tracking/mixing and mastering, and it can be booked out for everything from recording and live tracking to mastering, production and composing background scores.

Testimonial: “I’ve heard great things about the dedication and out-of-the-box methods of those who run this space. Ritwik and Amar have produced some incredible-sounding albums.”

Where: Lado Sarai, Delhi, India 110030

Connect with them on Facebook, Instagram or drop them a line at gharkarecordsonline@gmail.com

 

Kintsugi Studios

Kintsugi Studios’ founder, Abhishek has done it up painstakingly so that it’s full of good vibes. It has a great control room, a lovely balcony and the recording room (while slightly small) does what its meant to. Abhishek also hosts Kintsugi Sessions regularly and invites people to play the songs they’ve recorded.

Testimonial: “Although I’ve never recorded here, I’ve worked with Abhishek and he’s awesome. Calm, composed and methodical, he manages to get what is required without raising his voice or losing his cool. He’s also the right person to talk to about video.”

Where: 80-D, 3rd Floor, Sukhdev Vihar, New Delhi, 110025

Connect with Kintsugi Studios on Facebook and Instagram.

 

Katharas Studios

An independent art promotion wing of Saraswati Music College, Katharas Studios is centrally-located, has large audio recording studios with state-of-the-art equipment, a 1,400 sq. ft. video production facility and a 24-hour jamming station.

Testimonial: “ I’ve recorded a few songs here and, although the space is nice and the equipment is all there, you need to take a producer with you since their methods are a little old-school.”

Where: A-1, 226, Safdarjung Enclave, Block A 1, Nauroji Nagar, Safdarjung Enclave, New Delhi, Delhi 110029

Connect with them here.

Think you need a fancy studio to make music? Kendrick Lamar’s producer disagrees…..

Ask any musician and they’ll tell you that having an expensive studio and lots of equipment is the key to making a great record. With so much emphasis being given on production values these days, people often think that without the gear and the right equipment, they don’t have a shot at making great music. Armed with an iPhone and a gadget called the iRig, Kendrick Lamar’s producer, Steve Lacy, the guy who made the beat for the hit single “Pride(Damn. 2017) chooses to disagree. When his request for a MacBook for 4 Christmas’ straight was denied, he gave up and started exploring beat making apps on his old iPod Touch. With apps such as GarageBand, iMPC and BeatMaker 2, he realized the process of making music on the phone was actually rather handy. Without having to worry too much on the sounds, he could capture the essence of the idea and get into the groove of things much sooner. Being a guitarist, he wanted to ideate by recording guitar lines and soon got himself an iRig, a small, cheap device that lets you record audio into your Apple Device using the lightning connector found on iPhones. In a recent interview, Lacy revealed that he loved to make music wherever he went, like in the car while driving (not recommended and very dangerous!). Apart from the flexibility of writing anywhere, he also does this to prove a point to an industry increasingly obsessed with gear and production. He wishes people start focussing on the music and the performance more than the gear used to record it (I’ve been guilty of this in the past too, but have over time realized that a great song is a great song, no matter how its produced).

Also read: Kiki, do you still love me? What the summer hit teaches us about perseverance and patience

The most important thing, in my humble opinion, is the music. Does it move you? Does it move others? Sure, in an ideal world, we would all love to have unlimited access to Abbey Road Studios and spend months working on our albums there. But in the real world, isn’t it amazing to have the ability to capture an idea there and then? Capture the essence of the song, the very thing that makes it special at the moment and freezes it so the song stays special?

That being said, once the initial song has been put down on a portable device, it is best to finish it off using a computer with proper gear. Music production skills are a must-have in today’s day and age where musicians have to be their own recording engineers, producers, and marketers. Without adequate production know how it’s almost impossible to survive in the business of making music.

Steve Lacy’s inspiring story has a lot of takeaways, but the most relevant for me were ;

• BE READY: Inspiration can strike anywhere; in the shower, while walking, driving or doing any of the other mundane activities we tend to do every day. We need to be ready to capture it and for that, you should familiarise yourself with music making apps such as GarageBand to make sure a great idea is not forgotten (it’s very irritating, trust me)

• BE OPEN: Keep yourself open to new ideas and don’t disregard something just because its simple..oftentimes the simplest way is the most effective.

• KEEP WRITING : Write every day, even if there is no inspiration so that when it does strike, you know where to take it.

• STAY RELEVANT: With technology advancing so quickly, learn about all that is new and don’t ignore where the world is going. It’s easy to get comfortable with what you know, but if you don’t know what’s current, you’re going to be a dinosaur in an industry that changes every day.

Learn how to produce your own music on anything from an app to industry standard software by signing up for the Electronic Music Production capsule course where we provide experiential learning taught by industry leaders!

Did you download GarageBand or any of these music-making apps and start tinkering about? I hope this inspired you to write music and if it did, I’d love to hear your thoughts and your music. Mail me at srijan@projectmynt.com and I shall write back to you as soon as possible!

MY LIFE, MY RULES!

Things happen when you least expect them, at least in my case this stands true!  I really feel that many teenagers would relate to my story, the reason why I’m sharing it here with you all. So, just sit back and go with the flow.

It all started when I was 5 years old. I come from any other ordinary Indian family where I wasn’t given the opportunity to pursue my dream. My dad is a self-made businessman and obviously wanted me to take over his business eventually, but destiny has a big role to play in my story.

Also read:  What does it take to compose your own music today?

The advent of MUSIC in my life!

My 4th birthday partially changed my life when I was exposed to a new object called a ‘musical instrument’. I remember, my brother had got his mini-keyboard to play ‘happy birthday’ for me. I was truly fascinated by the sound of the instrument and the kind of talent he had. At that age itself, I knew what I wanted to pursue and what I wanted to become. Having said that, I asked my parents to buy me a keyboard the very next day!

Evidently, I didn’t know how to play so I started experimenting. In a few days, I got the hang of it and finally signed up for piano classes at the Theme School of Music, Trinity. I always had an inclination towards Bollywood/Hindustani classical music, the reason why Theme school was not my cup of tea. I struggled there for about two years and then decided to compose my own music.

Meeting my Guru – The beginning of a happy-go-lucky phase

At the age of 9, I started performing at family functions and small cafes, until I came across my ‘Guru’. I still remember performing at a Delhi restaurant when my Guru – the legendary Brian Silas was truly fascinated by how I was playing. It was then when he came to me and gave me the wonderful opportunity to learn piano from him.

We both didn’t have a typical teacher-student relationship where he was only teaching me for a commercial aspect. He treated me like his own son and wanted me to be a successful musician more than I did. He often took me for his shows and for PR events where I would meet all the legends of the industry. Opportunities started coming my way and I was also in charge of taking care of any event which took place in school. I was considered as a trendsetter when I was a part of kick-starting a band competition called ‘SAARANG’. This competition is now held in mostly all the private schools across India.

During my college days, I realised that music is the biggest asset I have been blessed with and I must pursue it. By now, I was an expert at playing 11 different instruments including the tabla, dholak, melodica, ukulele, etc, and was also working on my vocal skills side by side. Eventually, I got the opportunity of becoming the ‘Events In-charge’ of my college and be the in-charge of handling all the events which took place there.

After spring, comes fall.

I was very satisfied with the way I was growing but, my parents were skeptical about pursuing music as a career. I was truly passionate about music and did everything I could to convince them. I would often end up fighting and arguing with my parents to win the battle but unfortunately failed to do so.  The demotivation came along when I didn’t get the support that I required.  The sad truth is that the world knew that I was good at it and could make a future but still didn’t support me for their own reasons and logic. I eventually quit playing sports, stopped going to college and stopped engaging in social interactions because of the mental trauma I was going through.

It was a struggle convincing them and I eventually broke down. Secretly, I also wrote a mail to the A.R.Rahman School of Music and was qualified to join it, but obviously, no one was supportive of it and eventually had to decline the offer. The struggle was real.

Music, for me, was a way to express my feelings and thoughts. I started composing songs through which I could express my feelings and finally started posting videos on social media. Things started to change, I started getting appreciation from my folks. However, I had no option but to bow down to my societal pressure.

Faith is all you need.

In 2018, I finally chose the business path and came back to India. I started working at Wizcraft until I stumbled upon this opportunity called Project MyNT. The idea of MyNT came to us because we all were sailing in the same boat! We all couldn’t pursue our dreams due to the lack of opportunities coupled with social and family barriers where the concept of having a ‘safe’ job mattered a lot.

Finally, I decided that I won’t let any other kid go through the same problem, and that’s when Project MyNT was born. Our aim is to target all those students who go through the same problem. We want to give anyone and everyone an opportunity to pursue their unconventional paths. We treat this as an educational movement to bring some change in the society by introducing these unconventional career opportunities.

I believe, MyNT has made me realise that one should always listen to his/her heart and pursue those dreams no matter what. Everyone has to stand up for themselves eventually and so will I by pursuing music now, because – my life, my rules!!